This article is about the section of Interstate 75 in Michigan. For the entire route, see Interstate 75.

Interstate 75

I-75 highlighted in red

Route information

Maintained by MDOT and MBA

Length:
395.916 mi[2] (637.165 km)

Existed:
1959[1] – present

Tourist
routes:
Lake Erie Circle Tour
Lake Michigan Circle Tour
Lake Huron Circle Tour
Lake Superior Circle Tour

Major junctions

South end:
I-75 near Erie at the Ohio state line

 

I-96 in Detroit
I-94 in Detroit
US 23 near Grand Blanc
I-69 in Flint
US 10 near Bay City
US 127 near Grayling
US 2 in St. Ignace

North end:
International Bridge in Sault Ste. Marie

Location

Counties:
Monroe, Wayne, Oakland, Genesee, Saginaw, Bay, Arenac, Ogemaw, Roscommon, Crawford, Otsego, Cheboygan, Emmet, Mackinac, Chippewa

Highway system

Interstate Highway System

Main
Auxiliary
Suffixed
Business

Michigan State Trunkline Highway System

Interstate
US
State
Byways

← M-74

M-75 →

Interstate 75 (I-75) is a part of the Interstate Highway System that runs from Miami, Florida, to Sault Ste. Marie in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I-75 enters Michigan from Ohio in the south, north of Toledo and runs generally northward through Detroit, Pontiac and Bay City, crosses the Mackinac Bridge, and ends at the Canadian border in Sault Ste. Marie. The freeway runs for approximately 396 miles (637 km) on both of Michigan’s peninsulas. The landscapes traversed by I-75 include Southern Michigan farmland, northern forests, suburban bedroom communities, and the urban core of Detroit. The freeway also uses three of the state’s monumental bridges to cross major bodies of water. There are four auxiliary Interstates in the state related to I-75, as well as nine current or former business routes, with either Business Loop I-75 (BL I-75) or Business Spur I-75 (BS I-75) designations.
The freeway bears several names in addition to the I-75 designation. The southern segment was called the Detroit–Toledo Expressway during planning in the 1950s and 1960s. Through Detroit, I-75 is the Fisher Freeway or the Walter P. Chrysler Freeway, named for pioneers in the auto industry. Sections on either side of the Mackinac Bridge are the G. Mennen Williams Freeway or the Prentiss M. Brown Freeway, named for politicians who helped get the bridge built. Officially, the entire length is the American Legion Memorial Highway, after the organization